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Gower Rumours: King Arthur's Stone

Gower Rumours: King Arthur's Stone

GOWER RUMOURS 

Join us as we share some of our favourite tales of bygone Gower days. By revisiting the stories woven into the bedrock of the Peninsula, we keep our heritage alive. As time moves on, these legends often take on a life of their own and the rumours creep in…


King Arthur's Stone

The second episode in our new short story series features one of the most icon stones on the Gower. Situated on the northern ridge summit of Cefn Bryn, King Arthur’s Stone is the centrepiece of a Neolithic burial ground. Shrouded in legend and mystery, there are numerous tales to explain the stones existence. 

Did you know that the welsh name for the Neolithic burial ground atop Cefyn Bryn is Maen Ceti? The double-chambered megalithic tomb is formed by a massive capstone perched on a series of pointed stones. The quartz conglomerate weighs an estimated 25 tons, and measures around 13 feet wide and 7 feet high. Dating back to 2500 BC, it was one of the first sites to be protected under the Ancient Monuments Act of 1882. 

Various legends surround the existence of the impressive and iconic capstone with the most popular of these myths involves the stone’s namesake, King Arthur. Legend has it, the great King of the Britons found a pebble in his shoe while travelling in Carmarthenshire. He tossed it over the Loughor Estuary and it fell on Cefyn Bryn. 

Located in the very heart of Gower above the quiet village of Reynoldston, the stone is worth the walk. It’s an easy wonder from a roadside car park along a grassy track. With incredible views across the Loughor Estuary, it remains a popular spot for locals and tourists alike. So much so, it was visited by King Henry VII’s troops back in 1485. They took a 60 miles detour on their way to the Battle of Bosworth to see the stone. 


Nestled at the foot of the hill is the pub named after the stone itself. The King Arthur Hotel is arguably one of the most iconic pubs on the Gower Peninsula. Thought to have been built in 1870 by the Tucker Family, this Public House was originally called the Rising Sun and is one of the oldest establishments in the area. Now a multi-award winning venue the King Arthur Hotel is well loved by tourists and locals alike. It's also one of our favourite places to enjoy a pint of Gower Gold just minutes away from the historic landmark. 

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